Digital photography - http://karedigital.com

View Camera Magazine Large



    Barrington-based photographer launches national modeling, acting careers

  • SOUTH BARRINGTON — Aspiring models and actors don’t have to go to Los Angeles or New York to find a professional commercial photography studio to help launch their career. South Barrington’s Papadakis Photography features a versatile studio with staff that shoots photos for catalogs, executive advertisements and tourism promotions. Papadakis explained that photography started as a childhood hobby when he was growing up in upstate New York. For those commercial shoots, Papadakis said he uses large format cameras and high-powered lights to brighten the large spaces. Papadakis explained that his photos helped the museum capture the interaction between the exhibit and its viewers.


   View Camera Magazine Large Format Photography - 2 items found  View more items

Timeless Lessons Street Photographers Can Learn from Robert Frank’s “The Americans”

[Frank didn't pledge] allegiance to such “pure” photography, in which a single, great exposure was the ultimate achievement “. Therefore by working on this project, Frank was less interested about creating single powerful images (as many... It challenged the rules of photography, and emphasized feeling Not only did Frank challenge how he approached documentary photography and the aesthetic in which he employed– he also created images with an emphasis on feeling above all else. Steichen also gave Frank some practical advice with his photography (that carries lots of practical value today as well) on not doing photography full-time. It challenged the aesthetic of photography During the 1950′s, the tradition and aesthetic of photography championed clean, well-exposed, and sharp photographs. ” To better understand where Frank got his gritty aesthetic from, let us explore a bit of his background: When Frank started photography in his early twenties, he studied with Alexey Brodovitch , a Russian-born innovator for Harper’s Bazaar. Although many of us dream of making our photography a living, Steichen’s advice of keeping your photography and work separate carries strong weight. Steichen stressed the importance of getting an income elsewhere to keep photography separate from the need to earn a living – to truly focus on the photography without any constraints. It challenged the documentary tradition During the era that Frank published “The Americans”, documentary photography was seen to be as something transparent and not to be influenced by the thoughts, emotions, or viewpoint of the photographer. Takeaway point : Although Frank didn’t entirely listen to Steichen (for the rest of his career he pursued video-making and his photography) I think it carries great value for photographers today. “In the late 1950s and early 1960s neither The Americans nor Frank’s work made on his Guggenheim fellowship were well received, especially by the photography press. Introduction “The Americans” is a photography book by Swiss-born Robert Frank, published first in France (1958) and then in the US (1959). Don’t think that your day job prevents you from creating strong photographic work – rather see it as something that will help support you and in your photography. You can see that Frank took up Brodovitch’s advice by leaving his comfortable home of Switzerland to pursue photography in NYC. Edgy, critical, and often opaque at a time when photography was generally understood to be wholesome, simplistic, and patently transparent, the photographs disconcerted editors even before the book was published. Lessons from Edward Steichen (on getting closer to your subjects / keeping your photography and income separate) “I sometimes feel that I would like to see you more in closer to people. “Rebelling against the popular 1950s notion championed by Edward Steichen and others that photography was a universal language, easily understood by all, he wanted a form that was open-ended, even deliberately ambiguous - one that engaged his... This would be great early training in the early tradition of documentary photography to help him immerse himself into his “Americans” project. A Linchpin of “modern” photography, in the United States at least, this approach emphasized relatively un-manipulated prints made form a single negative, with glory given to the work that summarized an instant into a supreme moment of beauty of... “‘Straight’ photography was a favored term when both men began to photograph. Many of us don’t have the luxury or the chance to pursue our photography full-time. If we are much more sporadic and vigorous when shooting street photography, we should slow down and try to be more contemplative. That is, to practice photography on the side while getting a source of income elsewhere. I believe you made a fine decision in taking yourself and family away from the tenseness of the business of photography there. Frank worked in a very sociological, methodological manner – often utilizing a large-format camera and wanted to create transparent and “objective” photographs. How Frank Prepared his Trip to Photograph “The Americans” For those of you who are curious how Frank prepared his trip to photograph “The Americans” below is a rough itinerary of what he prepared:. Lessons from Brodovitch (on equipment and taking risks) When Frank was a young photographer, he shot mostly with a medium-format square-format Rolleiflex camera. Lessons from Walker Evans (on working in a methodological manner) Walker Evans, the already famous photographer for taking his “ American Photographs ” book was one of Frank’s early mentors. Gathered maps and itineraries from the American Automobile Association Collected letters of reference from the Guggenheim Foundation and friends in the press (in-case people questioned his photographing intentions) Introductions to representatives... Brodovitch was experimental, and “encouraged students to use blur, imprecise focus, large foreground forms, bleach negatives, radically crop and distort print, or print two photographs on top of each other, put gauze over lens of enlargers – to... On one account, when Frank went out to shoot with Evans, Frank noted how it was important to be more reflective (rather than spontaneous) when photographing. Responding to the country, as he later said, not by “looking at it but by feeling something from it. ”. Frank acted very much like the detached observer when photographing, and didn’t strive to make a sociological or analytical view like Evans did. Therefore Frank learned that in order to create emotional photographs, he needed to experiment with different techniques in photographing, printing, and presenting his work. Frank’s Early Inspirations Before Frank went on to shoot “The Americans” he learned many lessons from his mentors. Not only did Evans champion Frank’s work, but Frank learned many lessons from him (although their styles were quite different). If you look closely at his contact sheets, many of his photographs were either too bright, too dark, so off-balance, and out-of-focus that “Frank seems at times not even to have looked through the viewfinder or bothered to check the controls on... Frank was impressed with Evan’s careful observation of his subjects and his patience in waiting until the light revealed the scene exactly as he wanted to picture it. Although patience was never an attribute Frank valued or cultivated, keen... Subject matter that Frank Ended up Photographing Below are some re-occurring subjects that he ended up photographing in his trips around the U. S. 1. Therefore in today’s terms, I would advise against using a bulky DSLR and perhaps using a more nimble camera like a Micro 4/3rds, compact camera, or even an iPhone. […] Frank photographed his subjects with their backs to the camera, their faces partially obscured, or looming ominously in the foreground, as if they were about to turn and confront him (photos 29, 32). Frank was clear in saying that his work was a personal account of America, as he mentioned in U. S. Camera Annual 1958. Why Frank Decided To Shoot “The Americans” Therefore he embarked on a journey to America, and spent a considerable amount of time in NYC, where he met some of the most influential photographers and curators at the time including Andre Kertesz,... Brodovitch was well known for turning the magazine from having drab and boring photographs and adding dynamic montages of photos and text. It consisted of 83 photographs, with only one photograph per page. For example, if we tend to photograph slowly, we can gain skill by trying to photograph quicker. Public parks “When Frank helped Evans photograph tools for Fortune, he “learned what it is to be simple” and “to look at one thing and look at it very clearly and in a final way”. Oh yeah, and having certain cameras or lenses will do little in creating unique work (they knew that even half a century ago). Not only that, but Frank experimented printing his photographs with extreme contrast (disregarding the need to create an image with good tonal range), printing in extreme shapes (trapezoids), and would crop radically. For example, he would often be rejected by LIFE magazine to publish his work. However at the time, the Leica was the smallest, most maneuverable, and quickest camera to use. Steichen only thought it would be possible for Frank to do this by spending more time getting in-depth with the subjects that he captured, to get to know the small nuances and what made his subjects unique. However Alexey Brodovitch, a Russian-born photographer, designer and instructor (who Frank looked up to) suggested him to ditch the Rolleiflex for a 35mm Leica. What Frank learned from Brodovitch was “to respond to situations not analytically or intellectually but emotionally and to create highly original works of art that reflected their personal respond to their environment. Frank made no similar effort and rarely conversed with the people he photographed , for despite what was written in his Guggenheim application, his intention was not sociological, analytical, or documentary. Takeaway point : Therefore to sum up, Frank believed the importance of having role models and other photographers to draw inspiration from. When Frank embarked to photograph “The Americans”, he traveled over 10,000 miles across 30 states in 9 months. However in Frank’s “The Americans”, he was first harshly criticized by critics saying things like the prints were “Flawed by meaningless blur grain, muddy exposure, drunken horizons, and general sloppiness”. Rather to Frank, the feeling that the viewer got from the photograph was the most important. Rather, he was more interested in creating a strong body of work in which his interpretation of America wouldn’t be summed up in a single image- but rather through all of his images as a collective. After hearing this advice, Frank was inspired to go to Caerau, Wales in 1953, where he photographed a miner named Ben James for several days. Lessons from Henri Cartier-Bresson (on inspiration, influences, and originality) “Frank quickly learned from and assimilated new influences, often only to turn against them after extracting that all he found useful, a pattern that repeated itself... Frank was deeply impressed, it challenged him to become more than a fashion photographer. Frank lived with him in his home and photographed his entire day. “In the coming months, as he gained more confidence in his new approach and worked himself into what he later referred to as a “State of grace”, Frank’s style became looser, more casual, even gestural, and all about movement. “Evans had also photographed people in the south, but he had often gotten to know them first, as in his work with James Agee for their celebrated book ‘Let Us Now Praise Famous Men’ (1941). When Robert Frank worked on the Americans, consider it from his viewpoint. Steichen saw Frank’s strength at capturing the environment and mood of his subjects, but stressed the importance of getting to know “the soul of man”....

Read more...

Sep 26, 2012 by Keith | Posted in Photography

What are the controls and features of a Large Format Camera?


A large format camera is deceptively simple looking. A field camera, which uses large format film, may or may not have all of the movements described below (this is what the first answerer is describing) but was made for simplicity - usually used for journalism, the field camera usually does not have a back standard that can be released, but the lens standard can rise, shift, tilt and swing to a small degree. Large format cameras use a bellows between the lens standard (the thing that holds the lens in the front) and the back standard, which holds the ground glass and the film magazine or digital sensor. The standards are mounted on a rail or in brackets, which can be moved closer together or further apart to change the apparent size of the object. In between the standards you have an accordion or bag bellows. Because the bellows is soft and the standards are either on posts or mounted in a bracket you can raise, shift, lower, tilt and swing the individual standards, which will change the perspective of the shot by changing the relation of the light waves to each other as they enter the aperture as well as where and how the image circle strikes the ground glass (and film/sensor). You can also change what is in focus by the relation of the front standard to the back standard. In architectural photography for example, you often have to point the camera up to capture all of the building. The front standard is usually raised and set perpendicular to the camera's rail, but tilted up. You release the back standard and tilt it forward so it is parallel to the subject plane, and viola! the entire building comes into focus and is square - i.e the lines are straight without keyholing - the top of the building appears the same size and dimensions as the bottom. In product photography, the front standard is often tilted forward and the back standard tilted backwards (scheinflug) to control focus within the entire visual field, and the front standard is often raised

jeannie | Sep 26, 2012
Milo | Sep 26, 2012
Large format cameras are some of the most simplistic cameras, in that they consist of a lens, bellows and a back.(film holder) Most large format cameras have glass backs that reflect the image you are going to take. (reversed)You focus first, put the film holder over the glass, then set your shutter speed and aperture. many will have range finder views to help you guesstimate where your subject is in the image if you accidental moved the camera since you inserted the film holder.
Cisco | Sep 26, 2012
Controls? where they are the same as any other SLR or DSLR. The main difference between a crop sensor and a full frame sensor is that the Full frame basically doesnt crop the lens. Basically, on a 5D(full frame sensor) for example, 50mm is seen as 50mm on the other hand that same lens but on a canon 7D (1.6x crop sensor) even though the lens is a 50mm it is actually seen as a 80mm. so the only advantage over a large sensor is wide angle lenses well, they are wider and on the crop sensor telephoto lenses have more range. more example: 11-16mm lens: -full sensor : 11-16mm -crop sensor: 17.6-25.6mm 28-300mm lens: -full sensor: 28-300mm -crop sensor: 44.8-480mm
jeannie | Sep 26, 2012
A large format camera is deceptively simple looking. A field camera, which uses large format film, may or may not have all of the movements described below (this is what the first answerer is describing) but was made for simplicity - usually used for journalism, the field camera usually does not have a back standard that can be released, but the lens standard can rise, shift, tilt and swing to a small degree. Large format cameras use a bellows between the lens standard (the thing that holds the lens in the front) and the back standard, which holds the ground glass and the film magazine or digital sensor. The standards are mounted on a rail or in brackets, which can be moved closer together or further apart to change the apparent size of the object. In between the standards you have an accordion or bag bellows. Because the bellows is soft and the standards are either on posts or mounted in a bracket you can raise, shift, lower, tilt and swing the individual standards, which will change the perspective of the shot by changing the relation of the light waves to each other as they enter the aperture as well as where and how the image circle strikes the ground glass (and film/sensor). You can also change what is in focus by the relation of the front standard to the back standard. In architectural photography for example, you often have to point the camera up to capture all of the building. The front standard is usually raised and set perpendicular to the camera's rail, but tilted up. You release the back standard and tilt it forward so it is parallel to the subject plane, and viola! the entire building comes into focus and is square - i.e the lines are straight without keyholing - the top of the building appears the same size and dimensions as the bottom. In product photography, the front standard is often tilted forward and the back standard tilted backwards (scheinflug) to control focus within the entire visual field, and the front standard is often raised
CiaoChao | Sep 26, 2012
Depends on the large format camera in question. Some primitive large format cameras (such as press cameras) may not have anything more than rudimentary exposure and focus controls. Field cameras (e.g. Linhof Technika), will have tilt and swing and limited rise/fall/shift at the front standard. This is simlar to some medium format SLR cameras, such as the Rollei SL66, and Fuji GX680. Monorail cameras (e.g. Linhof Kardan, Sinar P, etc) give you the full range of control, with tilt, swing, shift, rise and fall at both ends of the camera. You also have exceptionally large cameras (ultra large format), which may be self built, or simply too cumbersome to make convenient perspective control.
Apr 20, 2011 by carrie30 | Posted in Photography

Photography assignment help?

Could you please help me, I am about to submit my first assignment for lenses in photogrpahy, Could you please tell me if there is anything wrong with the lenses i have chosen for the 10 different scenarios.. This is my assignment For each of the following hypothetical photographic assignments you have the following equipment at your disposal (note that you do not have any zoom lenses): Two small format DSLR cameras with full sized 35mm sensors 20mm lens 24mm tilt-shift lens 35mm lens 50mm lens 90mm tilt-shift lens 100mm macro lens 135mm lens 300mm lens Neutral Density Filter Polarising Filter Two quick cycle portable flash units made specifically for your cameras Transportable studio flash gear Tripod Monopod Nominate which of the above mentioned equipment you would use for each of the following 10 scenarios and give a brief explanation of why you made those choices: Scenario 1 A large art gallery has hired you to photograph every individual framed painting in the gallery for an upcoming exhibition. They require colour accurate copies of the artwork for use in a catalogue. A - 90mm tilit shift lens - You can be at floor level and shoot large paintings and correct for perspective because you'll be looking upwards. Polorizer to eliminate reflections, Tripod to eliminate camera shake Scenario 2 An advertising agency has hired you to photograph individual “pack shots” of a range of packet soups. The soups come in small rectangular boxes, which have a glossy finish. They want the pack to look heroic and important. A - 24mm tilt shift lens to make the soup look herioc and important, Polarising filter to minimise reflections on packaging, Tripod to eliminate camera shake Scenario 3 A men’s magazine has hired you to shoot an action outdoor fashion feature of a male model in the centre of a large city wearing various business suits. They want lots of movement in the images and are happy with some motion blur. A - 300mm Telephoto lens because this would give you great still shots with motion blur background. Tripod to eliminate camera shake Scenario 4 A sports magazine wants you to photograph an afternoon football game and they get you a press pass, which allows you access to the playing field. They want high contact physical shots with frozen action. A - 300mm telephoto lens this will give you high contact physical shots while being a safe distance away. Tripod to minimise camera shake Scenario 5 A lifestyle magazine wants you to shoot a cover shot of a woman in a large, bright, modern city apartment. The woman is to be the main focus, but they would also like some of the atmosphere of the apartment to be evident. A - 135mm wide angle lens would give a great focus on the model while having the apartment be in the shot too. Tripod to eliminate camera shake Scenario 6 You have been hired to photograph a wedding in a church. The light is bright enough to avoid having to use a flash and the minister has allowed you access to all areas A - 50mm ens great for up close and personal shots on there big day Scenario 7 You have been hired by a gossip magazine to shoot “social” shots at a gala movie premier one evening. The location is inside a dark Rococo (ornate) cinema and you have a press pass and are free to mingle with the “stars”. The editor requires a collection of posed and candid shots as the crowd parties through the night. A - 135mm lens because this will deliver high quality images in low light conditions Scenario 8 A book publisher has hired you to photograph Italian food in their studio for a new cookbook. The studio has large windows along one wall and lots of working space. They want the entire book shot from above, looking down on the food with an “aerial” perspective. A - 100mm macro lens for high quality close up images Scenario 9 A book publisher wants you to travel through France to photograph a book on wine. They want farm and regional images, as well as shots inside the cellars and manufacturing areas. They are on a tight schedule and have a limited budget, so you will be travelling alone in a small rented car without an assistant. You have only three weeks to cover all viticulture areas before the autumn harvest. A - 135mm lens for cellar and regional images, 300mm lens for farm animals this lens would be greatbecausee you can get a great shot from a good distance away and not disturb any animals and 2 cameras 1 for backup Scenario 10 A fashion magazine wants you to photograph the latest trends in makeup. You will be shooting female models in a studio and they may be accessorised with the latest earrings and other jewellery, but the makeup is the star. They are looking for striking, close-up images with vivid colour and texture A - 300mm lens would deliver high quality portrait pictures of the models, Tripod to eliminate camera shake and studio flash light gear. Thankyou xxx any helpwouldd be greatly appreciated


What are you doing, writing a book? Knowing what cameras, lenses and other equipment to take to a shoot is the direct result of attending professional level photo school and spending a few years working with a pro, learning from them, not only which equipment to take on specific assignments, but also how to run a business. Just the list of lenses you have available shows you are approaching this from an academic perspective, not a practical one and that you camera system of choice is Canon. I know a whole lot of photographers and ONLY one owns a perspective control lens (Nikon's version of a "tilt-shift" lens) I did note that no zoom lenses were included. The cost of operating a photo business is high enough since the advent of digital SLR's, using zooms is an important cost saving purchase I do shoot for magazines and here is what I would take on assignment. 1 - D3 (full frame dSLR) 1- D300 (APS-C sensored dSLR) 14-24mm f/2.8 24-70 mm f/2.8 70-200 mm f/2.8 200-400 mm f/4 28-300 mm and 18-200 mm "walk around lens" for the two bodies 300 mm f/2.8 50 mm f/1.4 (D300) and 105 mm f/2.8 macro (D3) - portrait lenses. 60 mm f.2.8 macro Xrite Colorchecker Passport (very important when establishing custom white balance when shooting pigments - fabric or art) I always have a good sturdy tripod and monopod with me I have one Nikon SB600 and one SB700 for flash I carry two Lowel, Tota-light lamps with umbrellas and stands I carry a Savage background stand and at least three backgrounds plus a chroma key green background. Where I would have to take special equipment would be for shooting the "art". I would use a 4x5 view camera and enough lighting to produce even lighting across the expanse of each painting as well as frames to hold polarizing gels for each. I would

fhotoace | Apr 20, 2011
fhotoace | Apr 20, 2011
What are you doing, writing a book? Knowing what cameras, lenses and other equipment to take to a shoot is the direct result of attending professional level photo school and spending a few years working with a pro, learning from them, not only which equipment to take on specific assignments, but also how to run a business. Just the list of lenses you have available shows you are approaching this from an academic perspective, not a practical one and that you camera system of choice is Canon. I know a whole lot of photographers and ONLY one owns a perspective control lens (Nikon's version of a "tilt-shift" lens) I did note that no zoom lenses were included. The cost of operating a photo business is high enough since the advent of digital SLR's, using zooms is an important cost saving purchase I do shoot for magazines and here is what I would take on assignment. 1 - D3 (full frame dSLR) 1- D300 (APS-C sensored dSLR) 14-24mm f/2.8 24-70 mm f/2.8 70-200 mm f/2.8 200-400 mm f/4 28-300 mm and 18-200 mm "walk around lens" for the two bodies 300 mm f/2.8 50 mm f/1.4 (D300) and 105 mm f/2.8 macro (D3) - portrait lenses. 60 mm f.2.8 macro Xrite Colorchecker Passport (very important when establishing custom white balance when shooting pigments - fabric or art) I always have a good sturdy tripod and monopod with me I have one Nikon SB600 and one SB700 for flash I carry two Lowel, Tota-light lamps with umbrellas and stands I carry a Savage background stand and at least three backgrounds plus a chroma key green background. Where I would have to take special equipment would be for shooting the "art". I would use a 4x5 view camera and enough lighting to produce even lighting across the expanse of each painting as well as frames to hold polarizing gels for each. I would
Jeroen Wijnands | Apr 20, 2011
Ace has a point, some of these photography course assignments are weird. Since you are suppose to learn I'm just going to provide some hints. 24mm tilt shift lens to make the soup look herioc and important Controversial. Many companies are NOT looking for this in pack shots. Scenario 3 The working distance alone would create problems here with people walking trough your shot. Think the other way. Scenario 5. 135mm wide angle lens One of these is a typo I hope. Scenario 7: Working distance again. Take a look at these kinda shots, a lot are at least upper body and many are head to toe even. Scenario 9: You have obviously never been in a cellar. They are cramped! Might I suggest you play with the focal length tool on the tamron website. http://www.tamron-usa.com/lenses/learnin g_center/tools/focal-length-comparison.p hp

View Camera Magazine Large Format Photography - Bookshelf


143 pages

Large Format Nature Photography

Creator: Jack W. Dykinga | 2001-10-01

Pulitzer Prize-winning photographer Dykings discusses how to use the large-format camera, which he believes is the best tool for photographing the landscape.

Publisher: Watson-Guptill Publications

About this book
A manual on taking large-format nature photographs, written by Pulitzerrize-winning author Jack Dykinga. The author merges photojournalismechniques with large-format photography to create spectacular images ofature and remote locations. In order to capture the intricacies, patterns,extures, tonal range and colours that made Dykinga famous, he uses a 4x5amera, film, lenses, light metres, filters, colours, composition, digitalacks and tripods. Photographers will also learn how to work with the weather,eep images organized and maintain their personal vision, as expressed inore than 200 photographs of Dykinga's own work.



216 pages

New Dimensions in Photo Processes, A Step by Step Manual

Creator: Laura Blacklow | 2012-09-10

See Supply Sources for contact information. View Camera Magazine “The journal of large-format photography,” published by the folks involved in Camera Arts (see above). The World Journal of Post-Factory Photography Post-Factory Press 61 ...

Publisher: Focal Press

About this book
Clear instructions and step-by-step photographs teach you how to mix chemicals and apply light-sensitive emulsions by hand, how to create imagery in and out of the darkroom, how to translocate Polaroid photos and magazine and newspaper pictures, and how to alter black-and-white photographs. A color portfolio highlights the work of internationally known artists such as Robert Rauschenberg, Todd Walker, and most recently Doug and Mike Starn, and an invaluable list of supply sources (including e-mail addresses) from throughout North America and Europe is included at the end of the book. Setting aside old distinctions between photographer and nonphotographer, New Dimensions in Photo Processes invites artists in all media to discover nonsilver imaging techniques. Painters, printmakers, fiber artists, sculptors, illustrators and photographers alike will find this a valuable, practical text outlining creative processes that require little or no knowledge of photography and chemistry.



400 pages

National Geographic Ultimate Field Guide to Photography, Revised and Expanded

Creator: National Geographic | 2009-04-21

Picture This bi-monthly, NYC-based photography magazine includes calendar and event information, photographer ... of the best photojournalists. www.time. com View Camera This bimonthly magazine dedicated to large-format photography ...

Publisher: National Geographic

About this book
Straightforward and entertaining, this is the ultimate source for people seeking real how-to advice from the editors and photographers of National Geographic. It is carefully designed to lead the amateur photographer to better pictures and is comprehensive in scope, explaining the entire process from choosing a camera to taking the pictures to printing, scanning, and archiving the images. The National Geographic Ultimate Field Guide to Photography spells out the basics of fine photography—whether you are using a digital SLR or a film camera—as well as more advanced techniques for the amateur photographer. From the top twelve color moves to creative gift ideas to quality camera phone photography, this guide will not only inspire you but also arm you with the practical know-how to get great images. It is the indispensable reference for photographers everywhere.


Manuals and Guides Directory

Camera - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The first permanent photograph of a camera image was made in 1826 by Joseph Nicéphore Niépce using a sliding wooden box camera made by Charles and Vincent Chevalier ...

Nicholas Hellmuth - Digital photography camera reviews ...
Digital photography reviews: digital camera reviews, black and white fine art photography, photography equipment (tripod heads, light stands, flash, macro photography ...

Nikon D90 12.3MP DX-Format CMOS Digital SLR Camera
Amazon.com : Nikon D90 12.3MP DX-Format CMOS Digital SLR Camera with 18-105 mm f/3.5-5.6G ED AF-S VR DX Nikkor Zoom Lens : Camera & Photo

Panoramic photography - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Panoramic photography is a technique of photography, using specialized equipment or software, that captures images with elongated fields of view.

Amazon.com : Nikon D810 FX-format Digital SLR Camera Body ...
Note on Availability: Due to high demand we anticipate being unable to fulfill all customer orders with our first allocation. Product supply from Nikon is very limited.


ADVANCED PRODUCT FINDER

    Don't see what you're looking for?

Editor's picks

  • Steve Simmons

    View Camera (Special Portfolios, September/October 2007, Volume XX, Number 5)

    Book (Steve Simmons)


Manuals and Guides


View Camera Magazine Large Format Photography - News


It didn't take long before he was approached by Parenting magazine and The Field Museum. “We photographed a For those commercial shoots, Papadakis said he uses large format cameras and high-powered lights to brighten the large spaces. Over time ...
Barrington Courier-Review - Jan 08, 2013

As with Sigma's other 46MP compact cameras, the DP3 Merrill's sensor is a Foveon X3 Merrill device that makes use of the fact that light of different colours penetrates silicon to different depths. As a result A large memory buffer enables the DP3 ...
TechRadar UK - Jan 08, 2013

Bob Mizer was one of the first photographers to explore the male-on-male gaze through film. For this fact, he has been called the Hugh Hefner of Before Mizer, censorship laws prohibited nude men from being photographed or even suggested on camera ...
Huffington Post - Jan 08, 2013

Generally speaking, a larger image sensor leads to better image quality—it's why some pros and hobbyists still shoot on medium or large format film. We saw a number of big sensor cameras in 2012—from the tiny Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX100 with a 1-inch ...
PC Magazine - Jan 06, 2013

A number of key features, unique to its HD cameras, have all been upgraded. Though a few new And to make ensure that everything is included, no matter how large the vista or crowd, every model now sports a wide-angle lens with less than 30mm ...
TechRadar UK - Jan 08, 2013


Certificates